Skip to Main Content
Nilgosc


2015 Scheme Frequently Asked Questions

What happens if I am separated from my spouse or civil partner?

While you are separated, your spouse or civil partner continue to be entitled to survivor's benefits.  You may wish to update your Expression of Wish form so that NILGOSC is aware of your wishes for payment of any death grant.


What happens if I get divorced or my civil partnership is dissolved?

If you get divorced or your civil partnership is dissolved your ex-partner is no longer entitled to survivor's benefits.

If your Scheme benefits are subject to a Pension Sharing Order or Earmarking Order your benefits will be reduced in accordance with the Court Order or Agreement.

If you remarry, enter into a new civil partnership or nominate a cohabiting partner to receive a survivior’s pension, any pension payable following your death will be reduced to take account of the pension share.  Benefits payable to eligible children will not be reduced because of a pension share.

Can I assign my benefits to someone else?

You cannot assign your pension benefits to someone else nor use them as security for a loan.

Why have I been automatically enrolled into the pension Scheme?

Employers will gradually enrol all eligible workers into a workplace pension between 2012 and 2017.  Under Automatic Enrolment your employer has a duty to carry out an assessment of its workforce to identify which category of worker each person falls into. Those meeting the age and earnings thresholds (eligible jobholders) should be automatically enrolled into a pension scheme on the employers staging date.  Visit the 'Automatic Enrolment for Employees' section for more information.

Can I retire early?

You can elect to retire and receive your Scheme benefits from age 55 onwards.  If you choose to retire early your Scheme benefits will be reduced to take account of their early payment and the fact that your pension will be payable for longer.  Visit the 'Early Retirement' section for more information.

Can I make up the payments if I have a break in service? (e.g. strike, career break, unpaid maternity leave)

Covering pension ‘lost’ due to authorised unpaid leave

Any period of authorised unpaid leave including additional maternity, shared parental or adoption leave will not count towards your pension unless you elect to pay APCs to cover the period.

If you are buying additional pension to cover pension ‘lost’ due to authorised unpaid leave your employer must cover 2/3rd of the cost if you choose to take out an APC contract within 30 days of returning to work or such longer period as your employer may allow.  Your employer will only cover a period of up to 36 months.  Your employer does not have to contribute towards the cost if you make an election after 30 days of returning to work, unless it has agreed to extend the period of election.

The amount of ‘lost’ pension that you can buy is calculated as:

  • 1/49th (1/98th If you were in the 50/50 section)  x assumed pensionable pay x period of absence 

Buying pension ‘lost’ due to industrial action

If you are absent from work due to industrial action this will not count towards your pension unless you elect to pay Additional Pension Contributions to cover the period.

The amount of ‘lost’ pension that you can buy is calculated as:

  • 1/49th (1/98th If you were in the 50/50 section)  x assumed pensionable pay x period of absence

The cost of buying this ‘lost’ pension is paid fully by you and there is no time limit on the period over which you can choose to buy pension that was ‘lost’ due to industrial action.

For more information on additional pension contributions click here.

Click here for Voluntary Redundancy FAQs

Also in this section